From lesson frameworks to developing as a teacher – IH CAM Modules 1-6

I’ve now completed about one third of the IH Certificate in Advanced Methodology (CAM) Online. This article looks at how it’s going so far and what I’ve been learning in the first six modules of the course. A future article will look at how it’s matching up to my expectations.

Course overview

Week One was an introduction and included the pre-reading for Module 2. Everything felt OK in this week. The calm before the storm in some ways…

Learning points from this module

  • I don’t do as much drilling as I should.
  • I take notes while monitoring less often than I used to.

Lesson Frameworks

Week Two was very busy. Two of the tasks were fairly quick to complete, but the other two were much lengthier. Task 2 was to upload a lesson plan with answers to four questions about the approach and Task 3 was to prepare a group lesson plan with 2-3 other course participants. Considering we are in different countries, nevermind have different ideas, this was no small feat.

Learning points from this module

  • I’ve started doing more guided discoveries (with structured questions on the IWB).
  • When using a teacher-led approach such as situational presentations, increase student-talk-time by involving them in the process – eg. keep recapping. I don’t use these approaches very often, but it’s still something good to keep in mind.

Receptive Skills

Both Listening and Reading are looked at in more detail later in the course, but this was an interesting starting point. In particular, considering top-down verses bottom-up approaches to texts and the development of sub-skills.

In (I think) 2015 I attended a very interesting couple of talks at TESOL Talks Vietnam where the presenters from RMIT put the case that we often test listening in class rather than teaching it. Listening exercises in the course book usually have a right and wrong answer. You either hear it or you don’t. Perhaps students check with a partner before listening again. Perhaps the teacher later shows the transcript, students find the answer (ie. they read it) and move on. Testing. Actually teaching listening involves sub-skill development, but that’s a topic for another day!

Learning points from this module

  • I want to learn more about how to diagnose what kind of Listening and Reading problems Ss are having. (So that I can choose suitable sub-skills to work on.)

Production Skills

Part of this module was focused on accuracy and fluencyI didn’t really keep good notes on what I learnt this week, but it did raise some food for thought.

  • It would be interesting to go through one of my lesson plans and see which stages are accuracy-focused and which are fluency-focused. (This was due to a realisation that lead-ins are often fluency focused.)
  • A lot of the accuracy work I do is written (eg. on mini whiteboards), not spoken.
  • Fluency activities are possibly an area where vocabulary can be exploited.
  • Remember to include “useful language” on the board as scaffolding in low-level classes in particular. (I hadn’t noticed I’ve almost stopped doing this.)

Differentiation

Additionally, here’s something I shared on the forum. We were discussing writing tasks as set out in course books, and the fact they’re often out-dated (eg. teens having to write a letter to a guy addicted to football).

The following is tweaked slightly to make sense out of context.

I think this module, and IATEFL YLT webinars I attended over the weekend, have helped me to focus on considering “What is the purpose of the writing task”? This has a bearing on how you teach it. If it’s focused on developing writing skills, writing ought to be done (most of the time). If the activity is language-focused (eg. using conditionals to give advice) or content-focused (eg. presenting a for-against argument), it can be good to try differentiation and offer students a choice on how they complete the task.

Does it really matter if they give advice to the football-addicted guy by speaking (eg. recording themselves giving advice) or by writing a letter, as presented in the course book? Perhaps at other times, like working on a for-against essay, the focus is providing arguments so a poster presentation outlining both sides is equally valid. And so on.

Advanced Lesson Planning

This was a light week input-wise. The Portfolio on the other hand was massively useful. My colleague and I worked on this together and developed an activity on inferring meaning from the text (reading sub-skills development).  

The Developing Teacher

Obviously we’re all taking the course to develop. This unit contained some useful self-reflection and some hows of doing that. We also looked at the varying roles of the teacher and it was interesting to realise that we can switch frequently – even within a stage.

Learning points and questions from this module

  • Some practical points on post-lesson reflection from both teachers’ and learners’ point of view. Realising I take less notes while monitoring (see Week 1) because I’m often playing the role of a Resource or Prompter instead of a Monitor.
  • Remembering that last summer I started getting my adult students to reflect at the end of the lesson, but oddly I’ve never done this with my YLs!
  • My classes are very student-centred, but is that the same as not being teacher-led?
  • I’m sure some students (and I) are aware of their progress, but how is this quantified?

That was useful for me to write out. I hope it’s useful for someone considering doing the IH CAM Online and who’s curious as to what it entails and what kind of things you’ll learn.

Over to you: What have you learnt or realised recently? What questions are you mulling over at the moment?

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